fredag 13. mai 2011

CNN : Antarctic ozone hole affecting weather in tropics, new study says.

Antarctic ozone hole affecting weather in tropics, new study says.

NASA satellites recorded an 11.5 million square-mile
hole in the ozone over Antarctica in 2000.
London (CNN)
The hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica is affecting weather patterns across the entire Southern Hemisphere, according to a new scientific study.
The findings published by researchers from Columbia University's School of Engineering and Applied Science is, they say, the first to demonstrate how ozone depletion in the polar region influences tropical circulation and increases rainfall at lower latitudes.
"It's really amazing that the ozone hole, located so high up in the atmosphere over Antarctica, can have an impact all the way to the tropics and affect rainfall there, it's just like a domino effect," said lead author of the paper, Sarah Kang.

"It's really amazing that the ozone hole, located so high up in the atmosphere over Antarctica, can have an impact all the way to the tropics and affect rainfall there -- it's just like a domino effect," said lead author of the paper, Sarah Kang.
Using state-of-the-art climate models -- created by the Canadian Center for Climate Modeling and Analysis at the University of Victoria, British Columbia -- Kang and co-author Lorenzo Polvani (a research scientist at the LamontDoherty Earth Observatory) calculated atmospheric changes produced by creating an ozone hole and then compared these with observed changes over the last few decades.
The close correlation between the climate model and the observed changes led Kang and Polvani to conclude that the hole in the Antarctic ozone -- first discovered by scientists in the mid-1980s -- to be the likely cause of the atmospheric changes in the Southern Hemisphere.


Head on Over to CNN for the Full Article there : http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/americas/04/22/antarctic.ozone.climate.rainfall/index.html

(me) - I'm guessing CNN haven't seen This Article :

Strange cosmic ray hotspots stalk southern skies.
16:42 03 May 2011 by Anil Ananthaswamy


Cosmic rays crashing into the Earth over the South Pole appear to be coming from particular locations, rather than being distributed uniformly across the sky. Similar cosmic ray "hotspots" have been seen in the northern skies too, yet we know of no source close enough to produce this pattern.

"We don't know where they are coming from," says Stefan Westerhoff of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Westerhoff and colleagues used the IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole to create the most comprehensive map to date of the arrival direction of cosmic rays in the southern skies. IceCube detects muons produced by neutrinos striking ice, but it also detects muons created by cosmic rays hitting Earth's atmosphere. These cosmic ray muons can be used to figure out the direction of the original cosmic ray particle.

 Full Article Here : http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20436-strange-cosmic-ray-hotspots-stalk-southern-skies.html

Ingen kommentarer:

Legg inn en kommentar